Fees & Commissions

Every few years, we do a research study to put together our Adviser Pricing Models Research Report. We’re currently in the middle of the data collection right now, and thought we might reveal a couple of the findings that we’ve discovered. Of course, when we re-cut the data after closing off submissions, the numbers will change somewhat, but so far, we’ve been fascinated to see that:

I wrote an article recently for Risk Adviser magazine, that I have recreated here for our subscribers. There are some significant changes afoot to the last bastion of advice commissions, and we’re getting a little concerned that advisers are being lulled into a false sense of preparedness by well-meaning, albeit inexperienced supporters. I’ve been very vocal in sharing our view that this does not mean the end for insurance advice, and that we may see an even stronger demand for professional risk advice, but I’ve also not sugar-coated it. Any adviser who currently receives up-front or hybrid commissions, be they risk-focused or provide risk in a broader proposition will find it challenging to make the changes necessary in their business. It will, however, be well worth it - as our experience shows us that the type of thought process and change required will have a dramatic impact on a range of areas of their business, not the least of which, their bottom line. Here is what was published in Risk Adviser…..

We've been busy these past few months, starting to work with advisers on how to handle the proposed Life Insurance Framework when it gets implemented.  Two weeks after receiving confirmation that the new government is supporting the industry-proposed new Frameworks, I thought it might be helpful to share a few free resources we've developed.

For advisers providing advice on insurance, it has traditionally been difficult to price that advice. While commissions largely remain post-FoFA, they are banned on some types of personal insurance. In my revised edition of Pricing Advice, I have devoted a much larger chapter to this area. An excerpt from this chapter has run in this month's edition of RiskInfo, which you can read here, and it is also reproduced below...

Most Australian advisers are currently absorbed in altering their business practices to comply with the new FoFA Legislation, and a particularly large issue is deciding on when and how to deliver their Fee Disclosure Statements (we now have a three-letter F word … the FDS!). We have heard of a number of advisers who are planning to post out all of their FDS's on the 1st of July, indeed some licensees are even suggesting this is a good option. It may have been suggested in the ASIC regulatory guide, but we think this is a dangerous strategy, and there are far better options that are still compliant with both the wording and the intent of the legislation.

When an advice business ceases to receive trail commissions it does not mean that they must stop receiving recurring income, and start relying on constantly winning new clients on a transactional basis. One of the most valuable components of advice businesses is the fact that they can generate recurring income from long-term relationships with their clients. It’s just that in a fee-based business, this recurring revenue may not be as ‘passive’ as it was in a commission-based business.